Buyers Meeting Point procurement by Kelly Barner

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Why eat locally grown food

Many people prefer to purchase locally grown food for several reasons. They are supporting local businesses and reducing their carbon footprint at the same time.

This week’s eSourcing wiki article is about sustainability in food choices. It outlines a list of suggestions on how to reduce carbon footprints by buying locally grown food.

We had a fresh salad for dinner tonight and it is in the dead of winter. None of the produce was locally grown. However, a compromise was that it was from the source that was closest to us.

This About.com article about Why Should I Eat Locally Grown Foods discusses eight reasons to do just that. One that I could relate to was that local foods are seasonal and taste better when you buy them in season. I love tomatoes that are right off the vine. They are sweet and flavorful. There is nothing like an apple fresh picked from the orchard. It is crisp and tart and amazing. When I was younger I would describe an apple that was 'rashy' if it was mealy and mushy. Usually that was one that had been picked many months before or was from very far away. Another seasonal favorite is corn-on-the-cob. Yes you can get it frozen, but it is beyond comparison to something from the local farmers' market. With a little salt and butter you have a delicious treat!

How about you and your procurement role? What has your organization done for reducing your carbon footprint by supporting locally grown food? Was it difficult to implement? What changes did you have to make in your food choices?

Share your thoughts by commenting below or tweeting @BuyersMeetPoint

 

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Wednesday, 20 September 2017