Buyers Meeting Point procurement by Kelly Barner

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LAVERGNE Management Matrix Operating Instructions: Benevolent Leadership

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I created the Lavergne Management Matrix to make it possible to share and discuss ‘Benevolent Leadership’.

The managerial aptitude of a person can be evaluated according to two criteria:

  • The satisfaction of her/her employees (whether trending down, stable, up)
  • The performance of his/her employees (whether trending down, stable, up)
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No Decision is a Decision

No Decision is a Decision

The Northeastern area of the United States has had a very harsh winter with heavy snow and very cold temperatures. Buildings and homes have been in danger of roof collapses due to the weight of the snow. There was a lot of communication about the issue for over a week about protecting your property and prevention activities.

Two schools about 100 miles apart were in danger of the roof collapsing. The official policy is to get three bids to select a contractor. One school followed that procedure and by the time that happened, another storm had occurred and the roof collapsed. The second school knew they did not have time to waste on the bidding process and used volunteers to get the job done.

Obviously no decision became decision. Now there is a much larger, more complex and expensive problem to solve in renovating the school.

In our professions we are often required to make difficult decisions, sometimes stretching the rules for the better good of the company. This article from Great Leadership, 8 Ways to Decisively End Indecision, gives great suggestions.

One that I have used before is “Step back and evaluate the impact of a wrong decision”. In this case, the impact was severe with damage to a public school. Other times, it won’t really matter so that is a good barometer to use.

A second pointer is “Set time bound parameters for making the call”. If you know another storm is coming, make a decision in time to get some of that snow off the roof!!

A great piece of advice I once received was “If you don’t know what to do, do something “. You can always make a course correction but you can’t do anything if you are stuck in park.

What do you utilize to make decisions? Have you found some things more effective than others?

Share your thoughts by commenting below or tweeting us @BuyersMeetPoint.

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Assigning chores and delegating as a manager

Assigning chores and delegating as a manager

As our children grew, we gave them chores that were appropriate for their age and capabilities. As toddlers, they could put clothes in the hamper and their toys in the toy box or closet. As the years passed, they could take on dish duty, mowing the lawn, laundry and so on. The big projects, such a painting the house, was a full court press for everyone.

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Performance Reviews for Procurement Managers

Performance Reviews for Procurement Managers

 

It’s that time of year.

Don’t shrink from the performance review process. It’s a time to reflect on the past year’s results, recognize accomplishments, and reset expectations with your staff for the upcoming year.

Purpose of the Performance Review

The primary purpose of performance reviews is to measure individual performance against the goals and objectives agreed to at the start of the previous year. I’ll dig deeper into this idea in a forthcoming post on Procurement Goals and Objectives.

Ask each employee to gather their final metrics and plot them next to their initial goals. This exercise reinforces the department’s goals and objectives to employees. Moreover, upon seeing their results, conscientious employees will honestly reflect about their performance before the actual performance review with their manager.    

Structure of the Performance Review

Companies use a variety of evaluation systems, but most follow the same basic format.

A rating is assigned to a small number of essential competencies such as “Accomplishments and Results”, “Planning and Organizing”, “Interpersonal Skills” etc. There’s often an area of the performance review reserved for Manager Comments (see Practical Tips below). Finally, an overall score or rating is assigned to each employee – often the most problematic part of the process for managers.

High-performers naturally want the highest scores. Anything less may lead to pouting or worse. But what if you are fortunate enough to have a whole staff of high-performers?   What if your company has implemented the controversial Forced Distribution or Bell Curve process for employee appraisals where you must assign 10% top score, 80% middle, and 10% bottom?

It comes down to judgment. If you’re hamstrung in the above situation, make it known jokingly to your staff that you can only award one ‘Exceeds Expectations” appraisal next year. Use it as an opportunity to introduce some good-natured competition among your staff, and make the metrics as transparent as possible along the way to avoid conflict later.  

Executing the Performance Review

Regardless of how warm your relations are with employees reviews should be formal; this is good time to remind both parties of the nature of the relationship and demonstrates how seriously you take their performance.

Allow sufficient time for each employee appraisal. This is the employee’s one on one time with the boss and it should never feel obligatory or rushed.  

Keep the conversation focused on the results. Methodically compare each metric or result vs. the objective. Make sure the employee understands your expectation for each measureable.  

Get Personal

The conversation need not be limited to cold metrics. It’s also an opportunity to have a personal discussion with the employee about their strengths, opportunities, and aspirations.

The good might be: “You’re excellent at managing a variety of personality types” or “I really like the way you break down complex information to cross-functional groups”.

The bad might be: “I’ve observed that you struggle to communicate with some Engineers” or “You have an opportunity to sharpen your presentation skills”.

For each improvement opportunity, have potential solutions as well as specific examples ready: “I think you would benefit from Extended DISC training so you are better prepared to deal with different personality types” or “ I want to review your next couple presentations with you in advance and show you how to keep slides / topics flowing smoothly”.

The best performance reviews are the ones where your employees leave fired up and motivated for the New Year; metrics alone rarely accomplish this outcome.

Practical Tips

  • Deploy a 360 or rounded feedback template to the employee’s key stakeholders; this is particularly useful for assessing interpersonal skills
  • Dump the essay format; use bullet points and semi-colons to string together short, sharp language when summarizing the employee’s performance; incorporate final metrics achieved in these comments
  • The performance review is not an occasion for “gotcha” moments. Like steering a ship, micro corrections are necessary throughout the year. Nothing shared in a performance review should ever come as a surprise.

 

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Blog Pick of the Week: Too Many Meetings

Blog Pick of the Week: Too Many Meetings

One or two days a month I have a day that has 9 meetings. Seriously? How am I supposed to be productive on a day like that? Or even if it is just a few meetings a day, when do we get to do REAL work?

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Blog Pick of the Week: Leadership Freak

Every day it seems like the task list is longer and harder to cross anything off. More and more meetings, emails, and phone calls keep getting in the way! With that environment, it is certainly difficult to have time for self reflection or to groom your team. When I came across this blog by Leadership Freak, it fit perfectly. It offers various outlooks in 300 words or less. Excellent!

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